Barbican

Konstantin Grcic

A modern, geometric chaise longue or corner sofa with a big personality, Barbican features an unusual minimalist structure, with pillows and memory-foam toppers upholstered in bold, block colours that can be used to create multiple looks. 

KONSTANTIN GRCIC AND BARBICAN

KONSTANTIN GRCIC discusses the process behind the BARBICAN sofa, why minimalism doesn’t have to be the bare minimum and the importance of working with manufacturers who understand collaboration.

Much has been written about Konstantin Grcic and his work over the years. Since founding his studio in 1991, the Berlin-based designer has won international acclaim for his unique design language, which brings together practicality, materiality and a gentle humour. His characterful furniture designs are part of the permanent collections of a swathe of the world’s top design and art museums and are also commercial hits. Seven years ago, Grcic created his first industrially produced sofa, the Cape for Established & Sons, which features a draped cover that can be changed to match the mood of the season, like a person changing their clothes. Now Grcic is rekindling his relationship with the brand to once again tackle the idea of the sofa – one of the hardest-working furniture pieces in any interior. The result is Barbican, a bold design statement with a strong geometric form, use of colour and a compact footprint, configured either as a chaise or a corner sofa. The idea, explains Grcic, is a response to the reality of the smaller spaces and changing relationship with the sofa in contemporary homes and offices. But it is also rooted in a unique approach to minimalism. Here, over a crackly phone line on a grey, wintery day, he talks about the genesis of the Barbican sofa.